A Cup of of Camomile¬†#quotes #Shakespeare #gardens #herbs #Spring #playwright #camomile

An English garden, or any of a temperate climate, through the seasons, holds a spell. It feeds the soul and mind in beauty, peace and rest and the body in herbs, spices, fruits and vegetables. Please note I’m mostly concerned with Spring and Summer.

Many herbs and plants have made their way into Shakespeare’s plays…their use in medicines (Romeo&Juliet), in metaphors (Hamlet, Henry IV) & in magic (A Midsummer Night’s Dream).

Shakespeare loved to garden. He would have been familiar with, and fully aware of the significance and importance of herbs. Their values, qualities and differences would have played on his imagination and are naturally and subtly woven (weaved) into his work with great effect.

“… though the camomile, the more it is trodden on the faster it grows, yet youth, the more it is wasted, the sooner it wears.” Henry IV

In herb gardens lie stories, tales and morals, and healing properties: prevention and cure.

Herbs and spices for sprinkling, wit and wisdom for thinking.


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The Importance of Being Wilde #OnThisDay #OscarWilde #quotes

“There is only one thing in the world worse than being talked about, and that is not being talked about.” Ok Mr Oscar Wilde let’s talk about you… 

‘the virtuoso of the well-turned phrase, the master of studied insult; the timing and precision of those verbal thrusts; aphorisms (short, pithy truths), paradoxes, ironical remarks, sarcasm and needle-sharp rejoinders …delivered with delight, and repeated with vigour.’

Oscar Wilde (born 16th October 1854) lived by his wit, and on his wits, often leaving his companions at their wits end, so they had to have their wits about them

Wilde in name and wild by nature.

A gifted, outspoken and eccentric poet, critic, playwright, and children’s writer. He was the very embodiment of style, and a fashionable, de rigueur, leader of the Aesthetic Movement.

He had a dazzling, enthralling repartee and his wicked brilliance made him an exceptionally exciting man to invite to tea; to be a victim of Oscar’s sharp, spirited, witty conversation would be ultimate flattery. 

Leaning over the table for a slice of cake, he might say –

“I can resist everything but temptation.”

“What a pity that in life we only get our lessons when they are no use to us!”

“Well I’m not young enough to know everything!”

 The witticisms, criticisms, wonderisms (this one’s made up!) of genuine genius

Oscar Wilde.



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