Marching on #March #April #Aries #Shakespeare #astrology #proverb #Leo #clocks #light #Easter

‘In like a lion, out like a lamb!’ is the sweet little proverb often associated with March.

We began the month with biting cold winds, hazardous black ice and blankets of snow; the fierce roar of winter raged on… and Spring was kept deep below the soil.

The origin of the proverb is to do with astrology.

Leo the lion is the rising sign, the sign in ascendency but by 21st March (to 20th April) Aries, the ram, arrives (lamb sounds better than ram).

March is, can be and may have been a difficult month for some. The month has several associations with erraticism:

‘March winds’

‘Mad as a March hare’

and Misfortune ‘beware the Ides of March’ from Shakespeare’s ‘Julius Caesar.’

This was spoken by a soothsayer warning Caesar of his portentous downfall.

When Caesar’s frosty reign ended on the 15th, it was nearly Spring.

The 25th March marks the change of clocks, with an extra hour of evening light…longer, lighter days are here to enjoy, providing the weather is kind.

Easter sneaks in at the end of the month too and then on Easter Sunday we awaken to April.

My new novel: ‘A Worldly Tale Told Of Mothy Chambers’ is available, signed, via kate@katebarnwell.com

www.katebarnwell.com

Advertisements

The World according to Oysters

On a day like today, out in the June sun, the sky a deep, jewel-like blue; there’s a calm, rolling sea, a safe shoreline, fresh oxygenated air and endless space.
You may look to the horizon and say the words:-

“The world is mine oyster!” Well you won’t be catching oysters from this boat in this English Channel but you will mean so much more when you look back on this proverb with ‘its highly memorable condensed bold imagery of its commonplace fact of experience’ (quite a verbal mouthful – break it down!)

What you are really saying is “I can achieve anything I want, go anyway; I have the opportunity (time and money) and the ability (health)!”

‘The Merry Wives of Windsor’ (Shakespeare’s play, written in1600) was the first to make use of this phrase:

Falstaff: “I will not lend thee a penny ”

Pistol: “Why then the world’s mine oyster, which I with a sword will open.”

The world doesn’t have to be expensive or exclusive or difficult to access; maybe we just have to change our perspectives…this view is free and makes you feel instantly liberated. Anyhow it’s food for thought (although while we’re on oysters, I hear they are quite a required taste!)