End of the Year! #NewYear #AuldLangSyne #celebration #song #remembrance #poem #midnight #kindness

Wherever you wake up today and wherever you end your night, be it Sea, City or country dwelling… be safe and be thoughtful.

It is customary, in English speaking countries, to end the year, at the strike of midnight to a delightful (if struggling) rendition of the Poem ‘Auld Lang Syne’ by Scotsman, Robert Burns, written in 1788 (with slight variations to the original) and sung to a traditional folk tune.

The translation of ‘Auld Lang Syne’ is ‘Days Gone By,’ or ‘For the sake of old times.’ That we might think of long-standing friendships, old acquaintances – they should not be forgotten – and days passed, memories made; reflection and contemplation and remembrance.

If ever there was a time of year to consider what has been and gone it is now, before we busy ourselves with what’s next.

So here’s to looking back fondly and moving forward faithfully.

Start the new year with a cup of kindness.

Should old acquaintance be forgot

And never brought to mind?

Should old acquaintance be forgot

And old lang syne…

For auld lang syne, my dear

For auld lang syne,

We’ll take a cup of kindness yet

For (the sake of) auld lang syne…

COMING UP in 2018, a new novel: ‘A Worldly Tale Told Of Mothy Chambers’

by K.G.V. Barnwell



Waking with words and Walking the world #words #poetry #coast #quotes

‘Sometimes, leaving the road, I would walk into the sea and pull it voluptuously over my head, and stand momentarily drowned in the cool blind silence, in a salt-stung neutral nowhere.’

This beautiful quote was written by Laurie Lee in his book, ‘As I walked Out One Midsummer Morning.’
Laurie Lee (26th June 1914-13th May 1997) was both a poet and a writer and in this case the two art forms have merged into one and created an incredibly atmospheric sentence. This is just one line, but it is how he presents his world to us...poetically.

How many ways can you be a poet in life?

1. A poet is someone who writes poetry and is defined as being a person with great imagination and creativity.
From 13th century Latin ‘poeta‘, from Greek ‘poietes‘ meaning maker and poet, from ‘poein’ to make.
2. Poetic, poetical, poetise…characteristic or befitting of poetry; to be elevated or sublime; to put into poetry.
3. Poetry…the art or craft of writing verse with qualities of spirit and feeling, rhythm and beauty.
4. Poetics…the study of the principles and forms of poetry.
5. Poetic licence...a justifiable departure from the conventional rules of form, fact, and logic…just as you find in gloriously creative poetry.
The world not as it is first seen, plainly and simply, but observed, described and presented in countless extraordinary and beautiful ways…which brings us back to Laurie Lee.
To criticise a poet is to deny their feelings, their interpretations and their imagination.
It is poetry that allows all these elements freedom…so set yourself free, walk differently and enjoy the wave of the world and the wonder of words. Wow!

Give us a Smile! #WallaceCollection #painting #art #smile

‘Time to lift the corners of your lips,
Turn them into a smile just for a little while.’

This grand painting is in the permanent, never to be borrowed, home of The Wallace Collection in Manchester Square, London. It is called The Laughing Cavalier, painted by Baroque Dutch genius of the Golden Age, Frans Hals in 1624. A man who was exempt at catching the fleeting moment of his sitter, his character, his individual beauty and his unique expression. The luscious clothes, collar and hat, whatever attribute suitable, would define and distinguish each fine noblemen.
The term ‘Laughing‘ was only given when the painting was catalogued for the first display exhibition at The Bethnal Green Museum, 1872-75 and has stuck ever since.
It is considered one of those ‘enigmatic smiles‘ leaving a touch of everlasting mystery; it can be quite beguiling, given a long pensive pause, or sometimes it feels like an arrogant smirk, perhaps he possesses a ‘cavalier attitude.’
If he laughed he may disturb the fantastic wispy moustache so stylistically brushed, drawing attention to those lovely pink lips.
It is a polished, preserved and perfected portrait.

This large reproduction is on the exterior of Hertford House/ The Wallace Collection and greets me as I walk north to the district of Marylebone. It is a reminder that a little smile lightens your face, catches attention and transforms your outlook…he will always make me smile.
It is also a good reason to slow down, pace yourself, to think quietly, then brighten your day and raise all prospects with a smile.
A shapely smile is a free creation of your own: a poetical pout!