A pea-green boat, a runcible spoon & a lot of nonsense #EdwardLear #poetry #limericks #London #May #nonsense #morals

Poet, Edward Lear, was born in London of Danish ancestry on 12th May, 1812. 
His ‘Book of Nonsense’ was published anonymously in 1846 and holds his most famous poem ‘The Owl & The Pussy-cat’ as well as over 100 limericks.

From the age of six he suffered from epilepsy and asthma. Despite being a sufferer he was still able to write creatively with a unique humour and to decorate his rhymes with fanciful illustrations.

His favourite nonsense word which was his own ‘sweet’ (‘they took some honey and plenty of money’) creation was ‘runcible spoon’ from ‘The Owl & The Pussy-cat.’  The word runcible appeared many times in his writing, defining different objects.

runcible cat’ 

runcible hat’

runcible goose’

As I tap away, scribing this tidy little blog, my iPad already dislikes the word, runcible, stating firmly ‘No replacement found.’ 

Moral 1: don’t let computers say to you, ‘wrong word, stupid.’ How are we to produce anything new, weird and beyond the ordinary?

Moral 2: don’t let being a sufferer stop you from branching out beyond the ordinary and making something work for you.

Since the 1920s dictionaries have come to define the term ‘runcible spoon’ as a fork-like utensil with two broad prongs and one sharp curved prong. 

A grapefruit spoon? A pickles or hors d’oeuvres spoon? Whatever your social habits, Edward Lear created spectacular vernacular.

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Lyrical Writer http://www.hastingsindependentpress.co.uk

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Old Books & Old Ways #AnimalFarm #GeorgeOrwell #books TheBookkeeper #Hastings #GrahamGreene #authors #writers #papers

It was a fine day for strolling, and a finer day for finding. 

Tucked down Kings Road in St Leonard’s on Sea, minutes from Warrior Square, the planted green gardens, fronting the English Channel with a statue of Queen Victoria, whose name became the late 19th century adjective to many houses of this area (‘Victorian’) lies the second-hand bookshop: The Bookkeeper.

With one look, I was hooked and reeled in. The book, sitting attractively in the window, ‘Animal Farm’ by George Orwell; a classic read and this particular book holding as much of a tale on the surface as the story inside. 

ANIMAL FARM, cheap edition, GEORGE ORWELL. 3s. 6d (3shillings and 6pence)

‘The publishers will be glad to send you from time to time descriptive lists of the new books which they publish. If you would care to receive these lists please send… your name and address on a postcard…’ (yes, do you remember postcards?)

This edition (see below) was published in 1950 by Secker & Warburg of Bloomsbury, London WC1.  

‘Animal Farm’ was first published in August 1945. By January 1950, George Orwell aka Eric Blair would be dead at the age of 47.

Cheap Edition was a term used during the War era of publishing, and sometime after, when book-paper was used sparingly and economically, although it must be said, between the fingers the quality is of a good standard.

‘Animal Farm’ is referred to as ‘A Fairy Story’ and as ‘a good-natured satire upon dictatorship.’

Being the sixth edition of the story, means the publishers invite you to ‘see back of jacket for Press opinions.’

Graham Greene, in 1945 aged 41, is literary correspondent to The Evening Standard, and takes second billing of 7 Press reviews. He states: “If Mr Walt Disney is looking for a real subject, here it is: it has all the necessary humour, and it has, too, the subdued lyrical quality he can sometimes express so well. But it is perhaps a little too real for him? There is no appeasement here.”

And finally, ‘To Mother from Michael, June 1951.’ 

This, too, is why we have books. To place names and dates and sometimes a message on a page that secretly says, I found, I bought, I give, I care, I love, I read and I get lost in another world. Old books, their ways and what they say.


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Kate Barnwell, Lyrical Writer for The Hastings Independent Press: http://www.hastingsindependentpress.co.uk

Cliffhangers #books #cliffs #EastSussex #NationalTrust #reading #adventures #cliffhangers

Are you on the edge of your seat with a good book?

May I recommend: The Case of Aleister Stratton‘ by K.G.V. Barnwell 

http://www.aleisterstratton.com

http://www.katebarnwell.com

Also available worldwide on Amazon.co.uk & Amazon.com

The photo below shows The Seven Sisters of East Sussex, the white Chalk cliffs of the Sussex Downs. The landscape, seascape and cliffs-scape are all protected and proud sculptures of British culture. The crumbly bright white cliffs are chunky slabs of cheese sandwiched between two beautiful blues: the shimmering sea and the celestial sky.

All the people look so small, even those long reflections on the rocks below, bottom right.

You make recognise this view from a National Trust calendar or from the film ‘Atonement

Best to find your cliffhanger in a book and view these cliffs from a safe spot.

Happy reading, happy adventures.

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Big News! #book #news #novella #cult #mystery #imagination #September #bookshops #London #Hastings #online #eBook

A cult mystery novella – released worldwide September 2016.

‘The Case of Aleister Stratton’ by K.G.V. Barnwell

An unusual name: Aleister Stratton; a mysterious quest for information; a chance discovery; the past and present merging. What caused this seemingly inexplicable death?

Imagine one morning you wake up and believe you have committed a murder.

At what point did the unconscious take over the mind and how much control can the conscious regain? What we do by day is one thing, how we pass the night is another.

How safe are we from the complexities of our mind?


“Stylish and beautifully written, combining elegance and gripping intensity; eye-catching and oft slyly satirical prose.”

~

“An intriguing and compulsively good read.”
~

Available NOW – signed copies from: 

http://www.katebarnwell.com

http://www.grosvenorartistmanagement.com

See the original website http://www.aleisterstratton.com

Available as a book and ebook from Waterstones Bookshops ~ Amazon Worldwide ~ Ingrams.

Follow my blogs http://www.katebarnwell.com

Act on your words #OrsonWelles #writing #acting #books #poetry


Writing is one thing, saying something in your writing is another.  
Who speaks to you? And in what way?  

Plays, poems, books, films, television, theatre and musicals; each have the ability to influence, inspire and infiltrate our lives – in their own way, at different stages throughout, maybe once or many times over.

Actor Orson Welles once said to a British friend “we have now acted in theatres, on radio, in films and on live television – they can’t think of anything else, can they?”

A new generation will always bring forth a new adaption of literature, and along the way make a new discovery for themselves and others, which means, furthermore, that ‘old’ books and ‘old’ plays and ‘old’ poems are always kept new. Of course new work is produced as well and that’s where we stand as writers today, creating and evolving…

‘A writer is a person for whom writing is more difficult than it is for other people.’


Follow my blogs http://www.katebarnwell.com

  

Latin – English – French – A new lesson in #poetry

John Gower (died 1408) was Poet Laureate to King Richard II (deposed 1399) and to King Henry IV (died 1413) and friends with Geoffrey Chaucer. He is buried in Southwark Cathedral on the banks of the River Thames in London. His head rests on his three best known books: Vox Clamantis in Latin, Speculum Meditantis in French and Confessio Amantis in English.

So, it got me thinking about poetry in all three languages: Latin, French and English and what one might present to the world has perfect examples of each…

In Latin
From ‘Ecce Gratum’ Carmina Burana
‘…
Bruma fugi,
et iam sugit
Ver Aestatis uber.
illi men’s est misera
qui nec visit,
nec lascivit
sub Aestatis dextera.’

‘Winter flies,
and now rises
Spring, the breast of summer.
His mind is miserable
Who neither lives
nor loves
under the right hand of summer.’

Tune in for the next instalment of perfect poetry in French and English…
Here is John Gower with his 3 books as one pillow.

A Book of One’s Own

How delightful to be able to sit on the banks of The River Avon in the town of Stratford upon Avon. There is no other river whose fine, wooden rowing boats are named after Shakespeare’s characters: Orsino, Banquo, Rosalind, Benedict…to name a few; where white swans swim up and down the banks and the willow trees sway, shading the benches, rustling as the rowers stride passed. This is the home of the Royal Shakespeare Company…good company indeed!

Oh and to read a little poetry of one’s own!

Are you in the picture? #QuentinBlake #Hastings

Marvellous illustrator and first Children’s Laureate, Quentin Blake, has captured the vitality and vibrancy of historic, old town Hastings in his drawings. His collection is on display at the local Jerwood Gallery and two vast boards even feature in the cafe! His style is energetic, fluid and lively – perfect for the seaside characters and stories attached to this exciting and jolly town. From boats, babes, to bikers and birds, you are stepping into a humorous story book; it’s a noisy, busy, wild world, where everyone is whoever they want to be! Hastings, East Sussex holds the Guinness Book Of World Records for the most pirates in one place, the total being 14,231 pirates. Arrrraaahhhh!

Everyday a different day…

Where shall we go today? Books and poetry, artists and their ideas can take us anywhere in the world; everyday we can discover a new voice, whether it be in your own language or translated into it, and a new place, whether it be real or imaginary, right where we sit. We don’t have just one tongue or one world or even one time we can have hundreds more of each!

So when you’re not travelling the world in body, you can travel it in mind instead…

“Earth has not anything to show more fair” (Wordsworth) 

“Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it” (Kipling) 

“All the world’s a stage” (Shakespeare).


“Great, wide, beautiful, wonderful World,

With the wonderful water round you curled,

And the wonderful grass upon your breast

World, you are beautifully drest.”

By William Brighty Rands

I’m reading a book in English, translated from the Japanese, set in Russia, China & Japan & set over many time zones…! So where are you today?!
  

‘Read All About It!’ #CharlesDickens

Today, 9th June 2015, marks 145 years since the death of the legendary Victorian author Charles Dickens (born 1812) who gave to the world a remarkable legacy of literature. He kept a punishing schedule which consequently affected his health; he died mid classic. 

Looking at his deep, dark, earthy stare, the wispy wise beard, the concentrated frown and the high forehead, it is clear he has more to tell us…

His book ‘A Christmas Carol’ (written 1843) was his first public reading (to The Industrial and Literary Institute) at Birmingham Town Hall in December 1852. Since then it has been adapted so many times over for TV, film, theatre, radio, recordings and opera; it has spawned graphic novels, parodies, pastiches and continuations, and public readings. ‘Bah Humbug’ as the almighty Scrooge would say. His ‘Dickensian’ work is forever re-interpreted keeping it alive; ready and waiting new eyes and ears.

Dickens made tours of England & America, reading his own works to enraptured audiences.

His characters and phrases have found their way so naturally and easily into the english language:

‘Please sir, I want some more!’ Oliver Twist 

‘What larks Pip!’ Great Expectations.

He died at home at Gad’s Hill Place in Kent, and is buried in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.