Persons of notable repute to this place came …¬†#history #poetry #GreatBritain #London

The old church garden on Marylebone High Street, London commemorates the site of the old parish church of St Mary on the River Tyburn, in the village of St Mary le Bourne, hence Marylebone. It was built 1400, rebuilt 1741, and demolished 1949.

On this site ‘Persons of notable repute in The History of Great Britain,’ are remembered.

Who are they?

Sir Francis Bacon (born 1561) English philosopher, statesman, scientist, jurist, orator, essayist and author.  

In the mid 19th century some of the plays conventionally attributed to Shakespeare were believed to have been written by him. He was MARRIED here in 1606.

William Hogarth, painter, engraver, satirist PORTRAYED the church interior, 1735.

James Gibbs, architect and pupil of Wren, was BURIED here, 1754.

Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Irish playwright and poet, MARRIED here 1773; he is buried in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Charles Wesley, co-founder of the Methodist Movement, BURIED here, 1788.

Lord Byron, poet, BAPTISED here, 1788.

Lord Nelson, WORSHIPPED here and his daughter Horatia, BAPTISED here, 1803.

‘So we’ll go no more a-roving

So late into the night

Though the heart still be as loving

And the moon still be as bright.’

‘We’ll go no more a-roving’ 

by Lord Byron, and his Romantic ideals.

If the building has to go, write down its memories and remember them, so we can pass it all on … This is what comes of wandering, look left and look right, stop and stare

  

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A Rosette to a Rossetti¬†#poetry #poets #London

The Rossetti family of 19th century, central London, became a distinguished bunch of people, dedicated to their talents of Art and Literature.  

The family house in Bloomsbury was filled with the old master influences of Petrarch and Dante Aligheri, as well as the visiting presence of Italian scholars, artists and revolutionaries.

Let’s be briefly introduced… 

Father of the family, Gabriele Rossetti was a poet and political exile from Vasto, Abruzzo, Italy.

Mother of the family was Frances Polidori, the sister of John William who was friend and physician to Lord Byron. John was also an enthusiastic writer; the first to create the idea of a blood-sucking-vampire, whose gentlemanly breeding, manners, and sophistication were based on Byron.

Son, William and daughter, Maria both became writers.

Son, Dante Gabriel Rossetti (and William too) was co-founder of the artistic group, The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood; he was an influential artist and poet.

And finally Christina Rossetti, the youngest child, was an intelligent and creative poet; with a mix of her own troubles and experiences, she channelled her ideas into poetry and prose.  

Today I wish to announce that it is she, Christina, who shall wear the rosette for writing some of the most beautiful, imaginative and evocative lines in the English language. She followed in the steps of poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning as the main female poet of her time (1860s) and was highly regarded and much appreciated by the critics of this male-dominated society.

At some point in your life, in some way and maybe without realising it, you will come across a Rossetti.

Raise me a dais of silk and down;

Hang it with vair and purple dyes;

Carve it in doves and pomegranates,

And peacocks with a hundred eyes;

Work it in silver gold and grapes,

In leaves and in silver fleur-de-lys;

Because the birthday of my life

Is come, my love is come to me.

Second and final verse from ‘A Birthday’ by Christina Rossetti.

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