Famous last words – literally¬†#famous #quotes #words #death #laughter #jokes

‘Famous last words.’  
This phrase, sometimes spoken with a rather sinister or sarcastic overtone, refers to the utterance of often wrong or inappropriate final remarks in conversation, but what about taking a look at the literal translation of ‘famous last words,’ that is to say the departing lines of famous people.
I’ve chosen three characters who, on their death-bed, managed to have the courage to give us the last laugh…

Actor Humphrey Bogart, died in L.A. 14th January 1957 aged 57, 60 years ago.

He is reported to have said, “I should never have switched from Scotch to martinis.”

American jazz drummer Buddy Rich, died after going into surgery, in L.A. 2nd April 1987 aged 69, 30 years ago. 

As Rich was being prepped for the surgery he was asked, “is there anything you can’t take?” (referring to any type of medication). 

His response, “Yeah country music.”

Writer Groucho Marx, died in L.A. 19th August 1977 aged 86, 40 years ago. 

In his final moments, the famed comic is supposed to have said, “this is no way to live!”

Couldn’t resist a few more Groucho reMarx to cheer this sorry tale’s ending…

“I intend to live forever, or die trying.”

“Outside of a dog, a book is a man’s best friend. Inside of a dog it’s too dark to read.”

“Behind every successful man is a woman, behind her is his wife.”

Amen.

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‘The finest hour’

Overlooking the beautiful cliffs & countryside of East Sussex, all is calm & peaceful, it is difficult to imagine over 75yrs ago this English Channel was a great defence against the threat of invasion & the scene of horrific ‘dog fights’.
Today we commemorate 70yrs since VE Day, Victory in Europe, & gaze happily on our magnificent Great Britain with pride. We must always give Thanks & Remembrance for the generations who sacrificed their lives for the Freedom we enjoy today; in everything we do the course of history plays a significant part. May we all take pleasure in many more ‘fine hours’.