Famous last words – literally #famous #quotes #words #death #laughter #jokes

‘Famous last words.’  
This phrase, sometimes spoken with a rather sinister or sarcastic overtone, refers to the utterance of often wrong or inappropriate final remarks in conversation, but what about taking a look at the literal translation of ‘famous last words,’ that is to say the departing lines of famous people.
I’ve chosen three characters who, on their death-bed, managed to have the courage to give us the last laugh…

Actor Humphrey Bogart, died in L.A. 14th January 1957 aged 57, 60 years ago.

He is reported to have said, “I should never have switched from Scotch to martinis.”

American jazz drummer Buddy Rich, died after going into surgery, in L.A. 2nd April 1987 aged 69, 30 years ago. 

As Rich was being prepped for the surgery he was asked, “is there anything you can’t take?” (referring to any type of medication). 

His response, “Yeah country music.”

Writer Groucho Marx, died in L.A. 19th August 1977 aged 86, 40 years ago. 

In his final moments, the famed comic is supposed to have said, “this is no way to live!”

Couldn’t resist a few more Groucho reMarx to cheer this sorry tale’s ending…

“I intend to live forever, or die trying.”

“Outside of a dog, a book is a man’s best friend. Inside of a dog it’s too dark to read.”

“Behind every successful man is a woman, behind her is his wife.”

Amen.

Follow my blogs http://www.katebarnwell.com

Advertisements

Old Books & Old Ways #AnimalFarm #GeorgeOrwell #books TheBookkeeper #Hastings #GrahamGreene #authors #writers #papers

It was a fine day for strolling, and a finer day for finding. 

Tucked down Kings Road in St Leonard’s on Sea, minutes from Warrior Square, the planted green gardens, fronting the English Channel with a statue of Queen Victoria, whose name became the late 19th century adjective to many houses of this area (‘Victorian’) lies the second-hand bookshop: The Bookkeeper.

With one look, I was hooked and reeled in. The book, sitting attractively in the window, ‘Animal Farm’ by George Orwell; a classic read and this particular book holding as much of a tale on the surface as the story inside. 

ANIMAL FARM, cheap edition, GEORGE ORWELL. 3s. 6d (3shillings and 6pence)

‘The publishers will be glad to send you from time to time descriptive lists of the new books which they publish. If you would care to receive these lists please send… your name and address on a postcard…’ (yes, do you remember postcards?)

This edition (see below) was published in 1950 by Secker & Warburg of Bloomsbury, London WC1.  

‘Animal Farm’ was first published in August 1945. By January 1950, George Orwell aka Eric Blair would be dead at the age of 47.

Cheap Edition was a term used during the War era of publishing, and sometime after, when book-paper was used sparingly and economically, although it must be said, between the fingers the quality is of a good standard.

‘Animal Farm’ is referred to as ‘A Fairy Story’ and as ‘a good-natured satire upon dictatorship.’

Being the sixth edition of the story, means the publishers invite you to ‘see back of jacket for Press opinions.’

Graham Greene, in 1945 aged 41, is literary correspondent to The Evening Standard, and takes second billing of 7 Press reviews. He states: “If Mr Walt Disney is looking for a real subject, here it is: it has all the necessary humour, and it has, too, the subdued lyrical quality he can sometimes express so well. But it is perhaps a little too real for him? There is no appeasement here.”

And finally, ‘To Mother from Michael, June 1951.’ 

This, too, is why we have books. To place names and dates and sometimes a message on a page that secretly says, I found, I bought, I give, I care, I love, I read and I get lost in another world. Old books, their ways and what they say.


Follow my blogs http://www.katebarnwell.com

Kate Barnwell, Lyrical Writer for The Hastings Independent Press: http://www.hastingsindependentpress.co.uk

A Cup of of Camomile #quotes #Shakespeare #gardens #herbs #Spring #playwright #camomile

An English garden, or any of a temperate climate, through the seasons, holds a spell. It feeds the soul and mind in beauty, peace and rest and the body in herbs, spices, fruits and vegetables. Please note I’m mostly concerned with Spring and Summer.

Many herbs and plants have made their way into Shakespeare’s plays…their use in medicines (Romeo&Juliet), in metaphors (Hamlet, Henry IV) & in magic (A Midsummer Night’s Dream).

Shakespeare loved to garden. He would have been familiar with, and fully aware of the significance and importance of herbs. Their values, qualities and differences would have played on his imagination and are naturally and subtly woven (weaved) into his work with great effect.

“… though the camomile, the more it is trodden on the faster it grows, yet youth, the more it is wasted, the sooner it wears.” Henry IV

In herb gardens lie stories, tales and morals, and healing properties: prevention and cure.

Herbs and spices for sprinkling, wit and wisdom for thinking.


Follow my blogs http://www.katebarnwell.com

Big News! #book #news #novella #cult #mystery #imagination #September #bookshops #London #Hastings #online #eBook

A cult mystery novella – released worldwide September 2016.

‘The Case of Aleister Stratton’ by K.G.V. Barnwell

An unusual name: Aleister Stratton; a mysterious quest for information; a chance discovery; the past and present merging. What caused this seemingly inexplicable death?

Imagine one morning you wake up and believe you have committed a murder.

At what point did the unconscious take over the mind and how much control can the conscious regain? What we do by day is one thing, how we pass the night is another.

How safe are we from the complexities of our mind?


“Stylish and beautifully written, combining elegance and gripping intensity; eye-catching and oft slyly satirical prose.”

~

“An intriguing and compulsively good read.”
~

Available NOW – signed copies from: 

http://www.katebarnwell.com

http://www.grosvenorartistmanagement.com

See the original website http://www.aleisterstratton.com

Available as a book and ebook from Waterstones Bookshops ~ Amazon Worldwide ~ Ingrams.

Follow my blogs http://www.katebarnwell.com

A Somme-ber Silence #TheSomme #WorldWarOne #anniversary #remembrance #EUreferendum #France #GreatBritain #democracy #decisions #bravery #Europe #poppies

The 1st July 1916 on The Battlefield of Northern France: The Somme; 20,000 young allied men lie dead, 40,000 wounded; the worst single day in British military history.

A sad, brutal symbol of modern machine warfare and of futility – the German machine gun was known as the Devil’s paint brush; a desperate loss of innocence for many generations and the devastating repercussions of what ‘Europe is capable of doing to itself.’

The battle raged for 5 months, by 18th November 1916 One million were dead or wounded on both sides; their bodies rest on muddy foreign soil, a white headstone remembers their fall, their sacrifice and their significant memory.

The 1st July 1916 is also deemed to be a mid-way point between the start and the end of World War I. 

30 years later a Second World War would just be ending.

A further 70 years later The Democracy of The United Kingdom would make a tight decision to split from the EU, European Union, and face the wrath of the World.

‘This precious stone set in the silver sea’ may now face a storm and have to sail a rough course, before, once again, ruling the waves and being the great, Great Britain it is. 

We all make the country what it is, so end the moans and groans and clouds of despair.

Don’t be SOMBRE, be responsible for making it even better and even stronger.

Follow my blogs http://www.katebarnwell.com

Look Out! #photo #quotes #unique #art #painting #frames #poet #artist #London #JohnLewis

Good morning, good afternoon, good night…

I’ve just passed by these quotes, set inside picture frames, for sale in a well-known London department store:

“Every picture shows a spot with which the artist has fallen in love.” 

Alfred Sisley (French Impressionist painter of en plein air-landscapes).

Every touch of the brush, from the layering of colours to the speck of a pigment, is essential in defining and beautifying the final, individual piece.

“It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see,” 

Henry David Thoreau (American author, poet and philosopher).

Everyone interprets ‘some-thing’ either similarly or differently, but first you must look and then you will see; first you will hear and then you must listen.

Each of these words is ever so slightly different from the one to which it comes close to.

Get ready for your close up and frame your Uniqueness.

Follow my blogs http://www.katebarnwell.com

Looking Rosy #poetry #roses #quotes #March #England #London #Shakespeare

“A rose by any other name would smell as sweet” (Act II, Scene II ‘Romeo & Juliet‘ by Shakespeare).
But I do particularly like ‘The Poet’s Wife’ (Auswhirl) grown by David Austin, English rose aficionado of Great Britain (see photo). This variety was introduced in 2014 and is the first yellow rose of his collection since the ‘Charles Darwin‘ of 2003.

‘Beautifully formed’ ‘Strong and unfading’ ‘Rich and Fruity’ 

Now is the time to start planting these beauties … there are some wonderful names to choose from. Take a stroll around Queen Mary’s Rose Garden in Regent’s Park, London and find hundreds of wonderfully named bedded buds (not yet in bloom, of course, but perfect in sunny June).

‘Why June is the time for a rose to bloom’

The rose is adored by poets from Robert Burns to Elizabeth Barrett Browning.  

Who is this poet and who is his wife? 

Ans. ‘Naturally rounded’ and a very fine inspiration for his work, perhaps.

Get searching and share your favourite named roses…
(See previous blog Captivated by Roses -November 2015).

Follow my blogs http://www.katebarnwell.com 

  

Pleasure, Pain & Poetry #Kipling #poetry #OnThisDay #January 

On the 18th January, 1891, poet Rudyard Kipling married American Carrie Balestier.
On the 18th January, 1936, 45 years later & 80 years ago today Rudyard Kipling died aged only 70.

“Kipling, though short, was lithe and slim, with beautifully balanced movements. His most arresting feature was his heavy eyebrows, which shot up and down with his talk: under them twinkled bright blue eyes.”

To learn poetry by heart (a short piece, a verse, a line) means we take a gift with us wherever we go; whether we travel alone or we share the poetry of our hearts, it can be a constant source of companionship.  

In grief, poetry can provide refuge and recovery and may be a helpful source of peace and understanding, especially when we struggle to find the words ourselves.  

Sometimes someone else, perhaps from another era or of a different gender, can speak for us.

Pull down that dusty poetry book from the shelf, or google a poem; read the lines and read between the lines and maybe you’ll realise that there’s a poet talking to you, writing for you; reach and you will find…


‘There is pleasure in the wet, wet clay,

When the artist’s hand is potting it.

There is pleasure in the wet, wet lay,

When the poet’s pad is blotting it…’

 Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936)

  

Two hearts #poetry #Italy #London #poets #love #January

On the 10th January, 1845, poet Robert Browning wrote to poet Elizabeth Barrett declaring
“I love your verses (her latest collection of poems) with all my heart dear Miss Barrett… – and I love you.” 
And so on this day began a courtship by correspondence of two beautiful poets.  

They did not actually meet until the May; Elizabeth was bedridden in a darkened room and suffering from an undiagnosed ailment. Browning waited patiently and longingly and remained undeterred in his affection for her. His weekly visits to Wimpole Street, central London were a restorative to her health.  

Thus proving that love, love-letters, love-thoughts and love poetry are deeply effective remedies.

They were married in secret in September 1846 at The Mary-le-Bone Church in Marylebone, and eloped to the mild climes and less expensive life in Italy.  

Poet, William Wordsworth is reported to have commented, “Well, I hope they understand one another – nobody else would.”

Thankfully (Mr Wordsworth) they absolutely did.

And so to you I say this, find someone who loves and understands you; someone you think about a little bit more than everyone else around you, and tell them…it will make them feel so much better.

‘The face of all the world is changed I think

Since first I heard the footsteps of thy soul…’

Elizabeth Barrett Browning: ‘Sonnets from the Portuguese’ VII


‘…And a voice less loud, thro’ its joys and fears,

Than two hearts beating each to each!’

Robert Browning: ‘Meeting At Night.’


Follow my blogs http://www.katebarnwell.com

  

Epiphany  #epiphany #poetry #Shakespeare #January #quotes #TwelfthNight 

To have an epiphany is to experience a sudden and striking realisation, which would then lead on to extraordinary revelations, like those experienced by Archimedes (mathematics, invention) Issac Newton, (gravity, mechanics, physics) Albert Einstein (theoretical physics) Charles Darwin (Creation & natural selection).  
Please note these are all examples of The Sciences, The Arts are not represented as examples of ‘epiphanies.’ I suggest everyone choose their own…eg. The Sunflowers (painting) by Vincent Van Gogh or A Christmas Carol (book) by Charles Dickens or Bright Star (poem) by John Keats etc. These are wonderful realisations; what they reveal is what you choose to seek and take from them; no formulas, no theories, no statistics, just pure, emotive, personal satisfaction.

In the Christian calendar the 6th of January, the 12th day of Christmas; Twelfth Night is Epiphany: the visit and adoration of the Magi and their realisation of the Virgin Mary’s incarnation and the revelation that Christ is the son of God. (phew!)

Fast forward to the 17th century

On the 6th January 1601 the comedy play ‘Twelfth Night’ by William Shakespeare was entered in the Stationer’s Register.

It’s the beginning of the year, we need some comedy, especially as one realises that the resolutions, so resolutely written, are now starting to dwindle and the still-winter months lie ahead.

The Magi ended their journey to see the new-born babe.

Shakespeare wrote a love song to be sung by the clown Feste to Sir Toby Belch and Andrew Aguecheek (great names!)

‘Trip no further, pretty sweeting;

Journeys end in lovers meeting,

Every wise man’s son doth know…’

From Twelfth Night ‘Sweet-and Twenty’

So it seems we are surrounded by wise men, adoration, revelation, realisation, journeys, love and poetry.

‘What’s to come is still unsure:

In delay there lies no plenty;

Then come kiss me, sweet-and-twenty!’

Shakespeare’s quotes and poetry still widely endure; their greatness, their humility, their magnificence, their grace, their morals… and their beauty.  

They search the soul for the same secret qualities; allow yourself to realise it; no equation or theory required.

Follow my blogs http://www.katebarnwell.com 

  

January Joy comes flowing in #January #poetry #England #NewYear #quotes

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Continued from yesterday…

Poet, Alfred Lord Tennyson, ‘I Stood on a Tower’ (1865)

‘Seas at my feet were flowing,

Waves on the shingle pouring,

Old year roaring and blowing,

And New Year blowing and roaring.’

Tennyson wrote to his lifelong friend and poetry editor, Francis Turner Palgrave:

“What a season! The wind is roaring here like thunder and all my holly trees are rolling. Indeed, we have had whole weeks of wind.” 

Here we are in January 2016, 150 years later, a new wind whips up the waves, stirs a restless sea and rustles the senses.

‘The gulls to the sky, went soaring

The waves, heavily churned, came falling

Whipped to the tip, spilt on the beach

A hundred horizons for us to seek

Today, tomorrow as the days flow

Bathe thousands of places for us to go

At home, for rest, we safely stay, until

The leaning winds send us far away

And just like birds, who leave awhile

We’ll each return to our worlds and smile.’

KB, 2015/16
Take the first week of January calmly: ‘J‘ for Jolly, for Joy, for enJoyment.
Follow my blogs http://www.katebarnwell.com
  

Having a blast! A rhyme for a reason… #BonfireNight #GuyFawkes #OnThisDay

‘Remember, remember 

The 5th of November

Gunpowder, treason and plot

I see no reason, 

Why gunpowder, treason

Should ever be forgot!’

In 1605 (410 years ago today) a plot to blow up the Houses of Parliament in London, His Majesty James I and Their Lordships was very narrowly avoided. It was hatched by a conspiratorial group of Catholics, headed by Robert Catesby, in protest at the increasingly oppressive treatment by the King and his ministers. 

The date was the 5th November: the State Opening of Parliament.

The plot was foiled.

It is Guido (Guy) Fawkes (a 35 year old Yorkshireman) who was discovered in the tunnels under Parliament with piles of wood hiding 36 barrels of gunpowder. Fawkes, noted for his coolness and bravery, was consequently stretched and tortured on the rack, then hung, drawn and quartered in Westminster Yard on 31st January 1606.

He is sometimes toasted as ‘the last man to enter Parliament with good intentions!’

Traditional Bonfires and Fireworks are lit all across the country on 5th November, and a good old ‘guy’ (‘a penny for the guy’) is made and burned to rapturous delight!
Lights, fire, explosions and danger all for a plan that never succeeded…how the course of history ignites us!

Subscribe to my blogs for free http://www.katebarnwell.com

Ps These dashing men dressed in hats, leather and exhibiting masterful beards are not Musketeers but Conspirateurs

  

Nelson triumphs at sea, then falls on Victory #victory #OnThisDay #Nelson #history

“Now gentlemen, let us do something today which the world may talk of hereafter.”
Lord Collingwood, British admiral, before the Battle of Trafalgar, 21st October, 1805…210 years ago today.

After four hours of fierce exchanges and superlative manoeuvring by British commanders off the south west coast of Spain, the French Admiral Villeneuve (Pierre-Charles-Jean-Baptiste Silvestre de Villeneuve – a man not short of names, but short of ideas) was humiliatingly beaten by the British. Of the combined Franco-Spanish fleet, 18 ships were destroyed, more than half its strength; they were no match in this game of battleships. The superb strategic moves and unconventional tactics of the British Naval Admiral Sir Horatio Nelson, were masterfully winning.
  

“First gain the victory and then make the best use of it you can.”

However our Inspirational leader (now aged 47 years) had already greatly suffered in Napoleonic battles-of-the-seas, with the loss of an eye at Corsica and an arm at Tenerife. On this ‘Trafalgar‘ day, he was mortally wounded by a French sniper as he stood on the deck of his flagship Victory.  
V for Victory and sadly, V for Victim.
His body was first preserved in a barrel of brandy and then transported back to London from Gibraltar in a lead-lined coffin filled with spirits of wine.  

He was buried in St Pauls Cathedral on 9th January, 1806.

Toast our British hero with a swig of brandy, maybe in one of the many Lord Nelson pubs?!
Subscribe to my blogs for free at www.katebarnwell.com

  

The Importance of Being Wilde #OnThisDay #OscarWilde #quotes

“There is only one thing in the world worse than being talked about, and that is not being talked about.” Ok Mr Oscar Wilde let’s talk about you… 

‘the virtuoso of the well-turned phrase, the master of studied insult; the timing and precision of those verbal thrusts; aphorisms (short, pithy truths), paradoxes, ironical remarks, sarcasm and needle-sharp rejoinders …delivered with delight, and repeated with vigour.’

Oscar Wilde (born 16th October 1854) lived by his wit, and on his wits, often leaving his companions at their wits end, so they had to have their wits about them

Wilde in name and wild by nature.

A gifted, outspoken and eccentric poet, critic, playwright, and children’s writer. He was the very embodiment of style, and a fashionable, de rigueur, leader of the Aesthetic Movement.

He had a dazzling, enthralling repartee and his wicked brilliance made him an exceptionally exciting man to invite to tea; to be a victim of Oscar’s sharp, spirited, witty conversation would be ultimate flattery. 

Leaning over the table for a slice of cake, he might say –

“I can resist everything but temptation.”

“What a pity that in life we only get our lessons when they are no use to us!”

“Well I’m not young enough to know everything!”

 The witticisms, criticisms, wonderisms (this one’s made up!) of genuine genius

Oscar Wilde.



Follow my BLOGs for FREE on the homepage http://www.katebarnwell.com

  

It just dawned on me… Aleister Crowley #poetry #birthday #Hastings #poet

Aleister Crowley (12th October 1875 – 1st December 1947).
Poet; chess-player: ‘nobody ever beat him;’ traveller; artist and occultist, labelled The Beast was born on this day 140 years ago and died in Netherwood boarding house (sitting 500 feet above sea level) on The Ridge, in my town of Old Hastings, East Sussex.

He chose room 13, at the front of the house, with extensive views of the Norman castle, Beachy Head and the sea.

He was described by his landlady as “popular, pleasing, charming; very erudite; a good companion, a stimulating talker and quite unlike anyone else; from the day of his dramatic arrival, he was clearly no ordinary mortal.”  

He had a large collection of friends, received many visitors, and parcels of chocolate from America – when rationing was rife in Britain. In fact from his room permeated the smell of a strong molasses-tobacco; it was stacked from floor to ceiling with his books and packages of chocolates.

He often took long walks along The Ridge, leaning on lampposts, palms to the sun.

But during his lifetime, he promoted himself as “the wickest man in the world” and “the devil incarnate.”

On the evening of his burial, the coffin travelled from Hastings to Brighton for cremation, there was a tremendous thunderstorm with lightening that continued all through the night; his good friend remarked, “Crowley would have loved that.”

He had an extraordinary presence, and an unusual persona, was distinctively different, possessing secret magical powers, beyond all ordinary comprehension, and keen to make friendships with the inquisitive and intelligent.

Netherwood house was demolished in 1968.

“But this is dawn; my soul shall make its nest

Where your sighs swing from rapture into rest

Love’s thurible, your tiger-lily breast.”

‘A Birthday’ by Aleister Crowley, 1911
It just dawned on me…
 

Foreign Bodies #poetry #poets #quotes #travel

Poets who are buried outside of their homeland, to name a few…

John Keats born in London, 31st October 1795, died, 23rd February 1821 of tuberculosis in Rome and buried in the Non-Catholic cemetery, Rome.

“Nothing becomes real till it is experienced.”

Percy Bysshe Shelley, born in Sussex, 4th August 1792 died in La Spezia, Italy in a boating accident, 8th July 1822, buried in the Non-Catholic cemetery in Rome.

“A poet is a nightingale, who sits in darkness and sings to cheer his own solitude with sweet sounds.”

Oscar Wilde born in Dublin 16th October 1854, exiled and died in Paris, 30th November 1900, buried in Pere Lachaise cemetery, Paris.

“Be yourself, everyone else is already taken.”

Elizabeth Barrett Browning born 6th March 1806 in Durham, died 29th June 1861 in Florence and buried in the Protestant English cemetery of Florence, Italy.
“Who so loves believes the impossible.”

“I shall but love thee better after death.”

Her husband, Robert Browning died at their son’s house in Venice in 1889 and is buried in Poet’s Corner, Westminster Abbey.
W.B.Yeats born in Dublin 13th June 1865, died in Roquebrune Cap Martin, France, 28th January 1939, repatriated in September 1948 to Drumcliff, County Sligo, Ireland.
“Cast a cold Eye 

On Life, on Death

Horseman pass by.”

Lord George Byron born 22nd January 1788, London, died of fever, 19th April 1824 in Missolonghi, Greece.
“Love will find a way through where wolves fear to prey.”

Rupert Brooke born in Rugby, 3rd August 1887, died of sepsis 23rd April 1915 in a French hospital ship, buried in Skyros, Greece.
“If I should die, think only this is of me

That there’s some corner of a foreign field. 

That is forever England.”

Spanish poet Antonio Machado born in Seville, 26th July 1875, died, 22nd February 1939 and buried in Collioure, France, after journeying over the Pyrenees to escape Franco’s Spain.

“There is no road, lonely wanderer 

Just wakes at sea, only that.”

  

Follow my blogs for FREE on my homepage http://www.katebarnwell.com

Turning into Autumn #autumn #poetry #Keats #quotes

Autumn cannot be officially heralded in as a new season until we have quoted poet, John Keats’ magical dedication to our temperate climate’s tertiary quarter of the year.
In September 1819 he took himself on a 16 mile walk across a Devon landscape, describing the scene in a letter:
“How beautiful the season is now – how fine the air… I never loved stubble fields so much as now – better than the chilly green of Spring. Somehow a stubble field looks warm – in the same way that some pictures look warm…”

With a pool pot of thoughts stirring and the atmospheric turn, from a harsh, relenting summer into a delicate, delighting autumn, Keats composed the poem ‘To Autumn.’

Let’s take a large, leafy leap into Autumn with him –

‘Seasons of mist and mellow fruitfulness,
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun…’

‘To bend with apples the mossed cottage-trees,
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core…’

‘While barred clouds bloom the soft dying day,
And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue…’

This detailed, sumptuous poem is tasty to read, melting keenly from the mouth as you pass over each wordy sentence.
Poets love words, why use just one word when you can enjoy a plethora (over abundance) of words?!

Autumn is here now…tumbling, crispy leaves; soft sun-bleached apples with tart, blushing skins; damp, dewy cobwebs and burnt, breathy bursts of sweet smokey air.

Waking with words and Walking the world #words #poetry #coast #quotes

‘Sometimes, leaving the road, I would walk into the sea and pull it voluptuously over my head, and stand momentarily drowned in the cool blind silence, in a salt-stung neutral nowhere.’

This beautiful quote was written by Laurie Lee in his book, ‘As I walked Out One Midsummer Morning.’
Laurie Lee (26th June 1914-13th May 1997) was both a poet and a writer and in this case the two art forms have merged into one and created an incredibly atmospheric sentence. This is just one line, but it is how he presents his world to us...poetically.

How many ways can you be a poet in life?

1. A poet is someone who writes poetry and is defined as being a person with great imagination and creativity.
From 13th century Latin ‘poeta‘, from Greek ‘poietes‘ meaning maker and poet, from ‘poein’ to make.
2. Poetic, poetical, poetise…characteristic or befitting of poetry; to be elevated or sublime; to put into poetry.
3. Poetry…the art or craft of writing verse with qualities of spirit and feeling, rhythm and beauty.
4. Poetics…the study of the principles and forms of poetry.
5. Poetic licence...a justifiable departure from the conventional rules of form, fact, and logic…just as you find in gloriously creative poetry.
The world not as it is first seen, plainly and simply, but observed, described and presented in countless extraordinary and beautiful ways…which brings us back to Laurie Lee.
To criticise a poet is to deny their feelings, their interpretations and their imagination.
It is poetry that allows all these elements freedom…so set yourself free, walk differently and enjoy the wave of the world and the wonder of words. Wow!

Turning Wilde

Feeling a bit rebellious? Want to be different, to be recognised, talked about (‘there is only one thing in the world worse than being talked about, and that is not being talked about’) want to express yourself in explosive & unusual ways, be eccentric, outspoken, extravagant & totally unconventional? Then go wild for Oscar Wilde.
A man of many talents (gifted author, playwright, poet, conversationalist, champion of the Aesthetic Movement, fine critic & a man of brilliant wit)!
It is hard to know where to begin with Oscar & impossible to stop.
He is pithy, cynical, eloquent, witty, cunning, satirical, unrelenting, & also a great, warm character, generous, spirited, brave & with a profound understanding of human life, human vanities and human frailties. There is so much to say about a man who said so much and I know I will come back to Oscar time and time again.

After the high points, the lows follow…so from a man who really experienced life, the last word must be with him –

“We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.”

In Conversation with Churchill & Roosevelt

Facing your critics, your opposition or your enemies is never a pleasant experience. Who could have met more of those than Sir Winston Churchill or Franklin D. Roosevelt? What advice might they offer me on facing criticism or insult? How might I brush off such remarks, having exposed my work to the world? So I put these questions to them…
FDR: “Happiness lies in the joy of achievement & the thrill of creative effort.”
WC: “Success is not final, failure is not fatal, it is the courage to continue that counts.”
FDR: “The only limits to our realisation of tomorrow will be our doubts of today.”

WC: “If your going through hell, keep going…never, never, never give up.”

Thanks guys, I knew I could rely on you to make me feel better & to turn the low points into laughs instead…after all, the world will always remember you, so where are the critics now?