Winter’s last full moon #March #moon #equinox #winter #spring #books #snow #weather #2018

Today, the 2nd March, is the last full moon of Winter before the Spring (vernal) Equinox. This year, 2018, the Equinox falls on the 20th March, when winter officially ends and spring begins.

This is the calendar of the Northern Hemisphere, those living in the Soithern Hemisphere will be entering winter and leaving spring behind.

The full moon today goes by many wonderful names.

Firstly a Worm Moon, named after the earthworms that emerge this time of year (although it’s unlikely they will be tempted to rise and push through the thick snow, currently settling across the U.K).

A Lenten Moon, ‘lenten’ from the Germanic languages meaning spring or lengthening, as the days become noticeably longer and lighter, both morning and early evening. From this word we also derive the term Lent, a period of the Christian calendar we are now passing through.

A Crow Moon: crows appear, signifying the end of winter

A Crust Moon: from the crust that forms on top of snow as it begins to melt and refreeze.

A Sugar or Sap Moon: the gathering of maple syrup from the maple tree saps.

Whatever Moon-name you choose to go by, it will be a late riser and high in an black, icy sky. Keep warm & hibernate & look ahead to springtime!

Coming Soon in 2018, a new novella: A Worldly Tale Told Of Mothy Chambers by Kate Barnwell

www.katebarnwell.com

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Firstly… The 1st of March 2017 #daffodils, #leeks, #StDavid, #Lent, #AshWednesday, #Wales, #history #tradition

Today, the 1st March 2017 marks many points of calendar interest.

Firstly, March 1st is St David’s day, the patron saint of Wales. He is remembered by the wearing of a daffodil. However for many centuries the leek was regarded as the national emblem. But Why? 

Well glad you asked. St David is supposed to have won a great battle and ordered his soldiers to wear leeks as distinguishing marks.

The daffodil, or Lent lily, is probably related to the lily of France, for Welsh soldiers are believed to have brought it home after fighting the French battles of Henry V.

Also Welsh for leek = cennin and for daffodil = cennin Pedr … extremely close in spelling and sound.
Secondly March 1st of 2017 is Ash Wednesday, the first day of Lent. Some people may still follow the custom of ‘giving up certain foods’ during the Lent period.

Lent comes from the Saxon word ‘lencten‘ because the days of Spring are now ‘lengthening‘. The days are getting longer, we have more natural light!

The ‘Ash‘ refers to the ash from the palms of the previous year’s Palm Sunday. At church Lent starts with the marking of a cross with a finger dipped in ashes on the forehead of those attending.

It is important to remind ourselves, whether we partake or not, of the historical and religious connections of these named-day diary events…“Just in case you come tête-à-tête with a daffy!”


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Good books in High places#travel #books #Spain #locations #photos #England #reading #foreign #mystery #worldwide

Taking a break from my world in soft, autumnal southern England and going to another world of granite, forested, undulating lands in southern Spain
Flying to foreign parts of foreign tongue and on the way reading a good fictional tale of English origin, ‘The Case of Aleister Stratton’ by K.G.V.Barnwell.

It’s wonderful to be able to travel and to photograph your own book in some new, remote and distinctive locations. 

This photo was shot on a lonely, high castle cliff of a Pueblo Blanco in southern Spain, with the Mediterranean Sea & rock of Gibraltar to the South, the vast plains of Spain to the North, granite hills and farmlands to the West and to the East, cork, olives and oaks trees clinging to the cliffs. 

Quiet and solitary, with eagles and vultures circling above, the perfect setting for a dark mystery.

Wherever next?
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Buy the mystery http://www.aleisterstratton.com ‘The Case of Aleister Stratton’


Feeling Fruitful #India #travel #life #experience #world #market

Namaste: Good day to all,

Where in the world are you?

It’s always a feast and a friendly fight to experience shopping, Indian-style in the depths of a Market in Goa, picking up the bare necessities…

4 tomatoes

2 sticks of cucumber

2 coloured peppers

2 baby aubergines 

2 red onions

Slice of pumpkin

A line of finger bananas (the King Louis of ‘The Jungle Book’ variety)

Large papaya & 4 limes

A Bunch of coriander & a bunch of mint

1 queen pineapple

Best price…

200 rupees = £2.10

Living extremely well, for extremely little, extremely easily in the extremes of India.

The brilliant capacity of the capable human being to be able to gradually and calmly adapt to new circumstances is, the very essence of travel.  

This is the continent of sensory overload and sensational awakenings…burning tandoors; coconut carts; piles of sweet red onions; light, warm embracing breezes of holy incense and night jasmine; swirling white egrits like spirits of the jungle; silky, pink sunsets.

Seeing is believing, so believe.

Uplifting, Enchanting and Enlightening

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Time to rage against the ‘dying of the light’  #solstice #poetry #December #Hastings

In the UK, the 21st December is the shortest day of the year – the ‘winter solstice’.

In Hastings, East Sussex – beside the sea and looking out about 40 miles across the channel to the northern beaches of France – the sun rises at 07.58 and sets at 15.54.

Every day the sun will set exactly one minute later, ‘come rain or shine’ as Sinatra once sang. However sunrise works at a much slower pace increasing (not decreasing yet) by one minute every few days.  

In the first week there is no noticeable difference, but you are happy in the knowledge that ‘the days are getting longer.’ What a great relief!

Naturally the sunset and the sunrise do not determine the weather conditions – these are a whole other phenomenon.

So whatever you are doing – indoors or out – you’ll be gaining priceless light minutes in which to do it, which will add up along the way…!

‘As the blinding shadows fall,

As the rays diminish,

Under the evening’s cloak, they all

Roll away and vanish.’

From ‘Night And Day’ by R.L.Stevenson

‘Rage, rage against the dying of the light…’
Dylan Thomas

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Grappling for grapes#poetry #life #autumn #travel

“On this day, one like no other normal day, there appeared out of the sea-blue sky, as if hung by puppet-strings from a god’s great height, swathes of sweet, bulbous grapes; soured green, swollen and plentiful. If I were but 2 feet taller, I might reach up and pluck the wholesome pipped and bulging berries, and squeeze their juices into a rich, fruity, intoxicating wine to warm the senses, the soul and all its sensibilities.

At first, a jovial disposition of happiness, gaiety and bacchanalian revels and then a stupor of quiet drowsiness.  

Alas, it is only their flayed leaves and tight plump bunches, dotting and dappling the stone in shady softness, that soothe and comfort my rest; whilst the heady heat of sun catches the quench of thirst upon my tongue, to leave me only contemplating such ripe gifts of fancy.

So near yet so far, for a mortal such as I!”



Unreachable Earthly Things for which we require wings,

Grappling for grapes, while the gods gaze and sing.

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Sunflowers & Sun Powers

When Vincent Van Gogh finally left the somber, grey and rural French North and headed South to Arles in 1888 great things happened. He found the sun.

The sun brought colour, life, brightness, warmth and lots of light; it beautified everything and everyone, and created some of his most famous paintings.

As the sunflower ‘tourne-sol’ (french) ‘girasole’ (italian) turns its head with the moving sun, so the sun brings inspiration to the artist and he captures it forever on canvas…